Solar Energy

San Jacinto College Goes Solar

San Jacinto College, located in the metroplex area of Houston, Texas, has announced plans to add solar electricity arrays to two of its buildings. The arrays, designed and installed by Sunfinity Renewable Energy, are set to lower the school’s utility costs by millions and contribute to better air quality in the area.

“Solar generation is just one part of the college’s commitment to improving our energy efficiency,” said Dr. Brenda Hellyer, San Jacinto College Chancellor. “We have always been a trusted steward of the community’s resources. These solar arrays are simply a visible reminder of that ongoing commitment.”

One of the arrays, a 391 kW solar system with 990 solar panels, will go into the Central Campus’ Anderson-Ball Classroom Building, slated to open in Jan. 2022. The building measures in at 122,000 square feet, and is notable for using foundations from previous campus buildings and as the largest educational building in the country made of mass timber.

The other array, a 263 kW system with 667 solar modules, will go into the Jones Building on South Campus. The Jones Building is currently seeing a $13M renovation project that started late last year and is scheduled to finish by fall 2021. Part of the renovations include updating the classrooms for peak period use.

“Sunfinity has helped a wide range of businesses reap the benefits of solar energy,” said Sunfinity Chairman and CEO John Billingsley. “That includes nonprofit and for-profit organizations, but bottom line – it’s about the bottom line. A ‘commercial’ solar system can return hundreds of thousands of dollars—even millions—that can go toward other priorities. We think San Jacinto College has made a wise decision in going solar, and we appreciate their confidence in us.”

About the Author

Matt Jones is senior editor of Spaces4Learning. He can be reached at [email protected].

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